FAQ: How to Set the Cover Image for a Gallery

So you’ve created your first beautiful gallery in D Emptyspce, but the cover image on the gallery previews is not the one you want.

Here’s a quick tutorial on how to set the cover image to any image in your gallery.

We start on your profile screen, where you’ll see the previews of your galleries. By default, we set the cover image as the first image you add to the gallery.

In this case, it’s the image on the leftmost wall.

How to change a gallery’s cover image

Step One

Tap a gallery to enter.

Step Two

Tap the wall with the image you want to set as the gallery cover. Then tap the individual image you want to use.

Step Three

After you’ve tapped the image you want to set as the cover, you’ll see three dots in the upper right corner of the screen. Tap those next.

Step Four

Simply tap “Set as main image”.

That’s it. Now when you return to your profile screen the cover image for your gallery will be updated to the one you chose.

Download D Emptyspace on iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

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Where we make D Emptyspace

As you might guess, as a company that’s creating a virtual gallery app, we pay very careful attention to spaces.

In our app, D Emptyspace, you don’t just upload photos into an album to share. The app encourages you to take time to arrange the photos, to tell a story, and to set the context so that fans and potential patrons can become a part of that story.

When we went in search of an office, we knew it had to be inspiring, to fit our aesthetic and, of course, help us tell a story. Here is a quick peek inside of our office. What story do you think it tells?

Our office is part of a space in Seoul called Hyundai Card Studio Black, which caters primarily to startups like us.

We have a tradition that when someone visits our office for the first time, they leave us a note wishing us good luck. This one, written in Korean, reads, next time I visit, I’ll come with my hands full, implying that we can expect some office warming gifts!

Here are a few pictures of us getting down to work, attempting to make D Emptyspace great.

We couldn’t possibly design an app for artists without some actual “art” in our office. You’re welcome to suggest some names for the pieces below.

Stick with us. We’re more than just a pretty office. The D Emptyspace app will let you create immersive virtual art galleries on your phone and unleash your creativity!

Download the app on iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

Follow D Emptyspace for more company updates and art-curated content!

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Marketing for Artists: Zero Budget Social Media Hacks

Marketing for Artists: Zero Budget Social Media Hacks

Social media is an exceptionally powerful marketing tool for artists. It gives you a way to share your art with the world, to connect with and be inspired by other creatives, and to get your art in front of a massive audience of potential buyers or curators.

“I’ve discovered so many new artists who inspire me every day just from their social media posts,”

— illustrator and Marvel comic artist Jen Bartel

Never before have humans been so connected. Remember that social platforms are still a way for people to engage with people not for people to promote their agenda. The most successful marketers and influencers cite authenticity as one of the most important aspects of social media success.

Social media’s not going anywhere. And it’s NOT too late to start.

There’s a mysterious assumption that it’s somehow “too late” to build a social media following on a popular platform. That’s not true. Every day, there are thousands of new artists getting thousands of new followers, likes, and upvotes through organic discovery.

Yes, it takes time to build a following. But it’s not impossible. As they say, “the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, but the second-best time is today.” Don’t let the fear of failure hold you back!

“Our best selling exhibitions have without fail been those where the artist has a decent social media following, posts regularly, and engages in an authentic way with their followers. The exhibitions that have sold the least have been those where the artist isn’t on social media, or is but didn’t use it to promote their show. This has become important enough that I now take an artist’s social media presence into consideration when deciding whose work I will show — something I didn’t do when I first started the gallery.”

— Kelly Heylen, Curator

There are two core pillars to growing on social. Sharing your own original content, and resharing the content of other creatives.

To attract and gather a following, you can’t selfishly promote your own art the entire time. The whole point of social media is to build connections with other people. You need to strike a careful balance between sharing your work and sharing the work of others.

Original Content

  • Photos of your finished art
  • Closeups of your finished art
  • Works In Progress (WIPs)
  • Videos of your artworks
  • Video or photo walkthrough of your studio
  • Photos of your exhibitions (bonus points if you’re with a fan!)
  • How-to’s or tutorials

Other Content

  • Artworks by your favorite artists
  • Art-related blog posts
  • News that affects the art industry
  • Local exhibitions you’re interested in

Getting in early on a social media platform or app

If you get in early on a new social media platform or art-related app, it’s much easier to build and grow a following. For example, early users on our app D Emptyspace (curate virtual galleries of your art in 3D) have a much higher chance of being interviewed, highlighted in our newsletter, and even curated directly in the app’s featured artist section.

By joining an app when they have fewer users, you can get more exposure from the start, quickly gaining traction and rising to the top of popularity charts. Plus your desired username or handle will probably still be available.

Click here to download D Emptyspace now and get in early!

The Most Popular Social Media Platforms

You can find a bunch of social media platforms online. There are no rules with how many platforms you should be active on. However, some have time-saving overlaps where you can share the same content over multiple networks (Twitter and Facebook connect particularly well). If you need help deciding which platform to focus on first, check out this guide.

Here’s a quick overview of the most popular platforms.

Facebook

By far the most popular platform. To use Facebook effectively, you’ll need to create a “Brand Page”. A brand page is very different from your usual Facebook profile. Features like audience demographics will help you get a better understanding of your fanbase. Check out this comprehensive guide on Brand Pages and learn how to use them.

Twitter

Twitter is a great way to connect with other artists and curators. Most users on twitter engage with others as a way of forming professional connections, so there’s a high likelihood you can build a good network

The key to success in twitter is to engage authentically with others. It’s appropriate to share personal struggles related to work, and some even garner traction by posting radical viewpoints.

Here’s my ‘no time wasted on Twitter’ game plan to get the attention of curators:

  1. Build a list of 10 curators, dealers or and collectors you think would be interested in your art.
  2. Put the list onto a spreadsheet (here’s a template you can download and use) and identify which curators are active on twitter (active is posting around 2 or 3 times a month at a minimum).
  3. Go through the twitter profiles twice a week (using the spreadsheet) and like, comment, and retweet relevant posts.
  4. Respond to any engagements you get back.
  5. In a few weeks, email the curators with the subject line “We’ve been chatting on twitter” and request to chat about a project together.

Instagram

Instagram is pretty intuitive for most artists. In a nutshell, you post your art, like and follow the art of others, and leave the occasional comment. The trick is in the hashtags (this symbol: #). By using hashtags effectively, you can attract new followers who’ve never been exposed to your art.

Check out how Daniel Stuelpnagel and Cande Aguilar are using hashtags to promote their work.

#barriopop #nyc #borderartists#latexsuitesandgardens

View this post on Instagram

Summer sketches! #summersketches

A post shared by Daniel Stuelpnagel (@kumokuchuni) on

#summersketches

Here’s a list of hashtags categorized by art style. Next time you post on Instagram, include hashtags in your description along with a brief explanation or context of the photo.

Pinterest

Think of Pinterest like your personal scrapbook. You can build boards, share ‘pins’ with others, and get quite an impressive amount of engagement. An estimated 90% of the users on Pinterest are female — something to keep in mind when deciding what to post.

Read a full guide on selling your art on Pinterest here.

Being active on social media vs having a digital portfolio

Not having a website won’t hurt your chances of being successful on social. A website is where you showcase your portfolio of work and introduce yourself in detail as a professional artist. It isn’t necessarily how you build a following online (although in some cases it helps).

If you’re meeting with curators, having an online portfolio (such as a website) will add to your respectability as an artist. Having a large social media following will imply your exhibition has a high likelihood of becoming a commercial success.

Beware of: getting stuck in the technicalities of building a site, wasting your time, and growing frustrated. An easier option is to build a portfolio on sites like DeviantArt or Tumblr (click here to see a full list).

A note on being popular…

Likes, shares, follows, upvotes, hearts, or any other form of social media isn’t an indication of your talent or success. Social media is a tool you can use to better your career and deepen your connection to the artistic community. Be aware that overusing it can be addictive and damaging to your quality of life.

We suggest you block out time for social media marketing as part of your ‘job’ as an artist rather than constantly checking to see how many likes you got on your latest post.

“Never play to the gallery. Never work for other people in what you do. Always remember that the reason you initially started working was there was something inside yourself that, if you could manifest it, you felt you would understand more about yourself. I think it’s terribly dangerous for an artist to fulfill other people’s expectations.”

— David Bowie

Are you struggling with social media?

Leave a comment and we’ll get back to you with some personalized marketing advice!

Download D Emptyspace for iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

Follow D Emptyspace for more company updates and art-curated content!

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Download