How to move photos of your art from computer to iPhone

Taking great photos of your art is a necessity if you want to share them online. But with so many different methods, editing apps, and device types out there, it’s easy to get confused with the technicalities of sharing images.

Here are the fastest and easiest ways to transfer your art from your Mac or Windows PC to your iPhone, so that you can use them in the D Emptyspace galleries you curate.

How to transfer images from your computer to your iPhone wirelessly.

While it’s still possible to plug in a cable and download media from your computer to your iPhone, it’s probably not necessary if you are connected to the internet.

If you are using Adobe’s Creative Cloud products (like Lightroom and Photoshop) to edit your photographs, you can easily set up automatic syncing that shares your images across all your signed-in devices (particularly useful if you’re juggling between a desktop, laptop, and iPhone).

All methods, unless otherwise stated, can be used to transfer from a Windows computer or a Mac to an iPhone.

Lightroom CC (recommended method)

NOTE: You need to have Lightroom CC installed on both your devices. If you are using Lightroom classic, you will need to export your photos and transfer them using one of the methods below.

Step 1:

In the “Library” section, go to the “Identity Plate” and click it to open the “Activity Center.” Enable syncing by clicking “Start”. (make sure this option is active on both devices).

Step 2:

Open the “Collections” panel and choose which collections get synced.

Step 3:

On your iPhone, you can now open your synced collections on the Lightroom CC app. Just download them to your device to prepare for upload to D Emptyspace.

Photoshop CC (and other Creative Cloud users)

If you are using Adobe’s Creative Cloud, there is a shared folder you can use to transfer your images.

Step 1:

Export your images from Photoshop to JPEG format.

Step 2:

Locate the Creative Cloud folder on your computer (available both on Mac and Windows) and move the images you want to that folder.

Step 3:

Sign into Creative Cloud on Mobile to access your images and press the download button to save the images to your device. Click here for a more detailed explanation.

Step 4:

On your iPhone, you can now upload your saved photos to D Emptyspace from your gallery.

AirDrop (only for iPhone and Mac users)

This method will only work if you are using a Mac computer. AirDrop is only available on Apple devices.

Step 1:

Save your photos from the image editing software of your choice to JPEG file format.

Step 2:

Locate and select your image, right click, select share, then select AirDrop.

Step 3:

On your iPhone, navigate to the iDrop app to see your images. Photos should be automatically added to your photos app.

Step 4:

You can now upload your photos to D Emptyspace.

Google Drive

NOTE: If you prefer Dropbox or Microsoft OneDrive the process is essentially the same as for Google Drive, just using different apps.

Step 1:

Install and sign into Google Drive on both your computer (or laptop) and your iPhone.

Step 2:

From your computer, drag and drop your photographs into Google Drive.

Step 3:

From your iPhone, open the Google Drive app and select the photos you want (select multiples by long pressing) and press the download button (looks like a downwards arrow).

Step 4:

When you add a photo in the D Emptyspace app, your downloaded photos should appear in your “Recently added” folder.

How to curate your gallery online

Customize your gallery on D Emptyspace

Once you’ve moved your photos from your computer to your phone, you’re ready to start using them in D Emptyspace galleries. If you need tips on how to curate amazing galleries, some of the articles and interviews linked below may come in handy:

Need some help getting started with D Emptyspace or just wondering at this point “What the heck in D Emptyspace, anyway?” Here’s our Quickstart Guide.

Download D Emptyspace for iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

Follow D Emptyspace for more company updates and art-curated content!

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Download

Previous ArticleNext Article
F.

FAQ: Do I have to retype my artist statement in D Emptyspace?

FAQ: Do I have to retype my artist statement in D Emptyspace?

“I’ve already written descriptions for my art and my artist statement. Do I have to retype them on D Emptyspace?”

This is one of the most common questions we’ve gotten from artists and photographers using D Emptyspace (download for iPhone) so far. In the long run, the best way to bring existing text into your galleries will be using the web version, slated for release later this summer.

In the meantime, here’s a relatively straightforward workaround for transferring text from your Mac or PC to the iPhone version of D Emptyspace.

Using a Mac

Note: For this to work, your phone and your Mac must be on the same iCloud account.

Step 1: Write or open your text.

Everything can be together in one document, just note which descriptions go with which images.

Step 2: Open the Notes app.

You can just click on Notes if it’s in the dock.

If it isn’t in your dock, you can click the magnifying glass in the upper right corner of your screen to search for “Notes” in Spotlight.

You can find Notes in the Launchpad, which you can open by pressing the F4 key or by “pinching” your trackpad (on a laptop) with three fingers and your thumb.

Step 3: Create a new note and paste in the text.

Click the new note button or press Command + N

Copy (Command + C) your text from whatever app you wrote it in, and paste it into the Notes App (Command + V). You can also write the text directly in the Notes app.

Step 4: Copy from Notes to D Emptyspace

Open the notes app on your iPhone.

Copy the text you need for a section of your gallery by holding your finger on the screen until a select box appears. Once you select the text you need, select “Copy” from the menu that appears.

In the D Emptyspace App open the gallery or photo that you’re editing. In the text entry space, hold your finger down just like you did to copy. A menu with the option to “Paste” will appear.

Tap “Save”

Using a PC or a Mac

Step 1: Write or open your text.

Everything can be together in one document, just note which descriptions go with which images.

Step 2: Send yourself an email

Open your email app or website.

Compose a new email. Put your own email address in the TO field.

Copy (Command + C) your text from whatever app you wrote it in, and paste it into the email body (Command + V). You can also write the text directly in the email.

Send the email.

Step 3: Copy from the email to D Emptyspace

Open the email app on your iPhone.

Copy the text you need for a section of your gallery by holding your finger on the screen until a select box appears. Once you select the text you need, select “Copy” from the menu that appears.

In the D Emptyspace App open the gallery or photo that you’re editing. In the text entry space, hold your finger down just like you did to copy. A menu with the option to “Paste” will appear.

Tap “Save”

Other Methods

Many messenger apps like WhatsApp and KakaoTalk allow you to send messages to yourself. You’ll need to install the app on both your phone and your computer.

You can create a shared Google Doc using your Gmail account and access it from both your computer and your phone.

If you prefer Microsoft to Google, you can create a shared document on Microsoft OneDrive or OneNote.

Download D Emptyspace for iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

Follow D Emptyspace for more company updates and art-curated content!

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Download

T.

Three Time Tested Ways to Arrange Art in Galleries

Three Time Tested Ways to Arrange Art in Galleries

fImages from Krzysztof Kowalik on Unsplash

Earlier this week, we brought you Five Resources to Master the Art of Storytelling through Curation, looking at how you can give your own galleries the same wow factor as what you’d see in a museum.

Today we’re going even more basic with clear examples of three time tested ways to arrange art on walls. First we’ll look at a few common arrangements that are proven to work. Then we’ll look at some of the elements in your photographs or artwork that help you decide what goes where.

I suppose that maybe this doesn’t need to be repeated, but remember that if you really want to make an impression, you have to get good at editing and only show off your best work, not everything.

Common Arrangements for Art and Photos

There are a two very practical reasons that galleries seldom hang artwork in clusters, preferring instead for linear layouts.

A linear layout in D Emptyspace. Single, diptych and triptych.

First, when galleries are crowded, a linear layout allows visitors to walk though and enjoy each piece of art equally. Second, it means each work can be at approximately eye level. (Gallery height is 57 inches or 145 cm “on center”. This isn’t something you’ll need to worry about though in a virtual gallery like D Emptyspace.)

The Single

Thanks to what I’ve dubbed the “Instagram Effect”, most of us consume and showcase our art and photography in singles, or one-off images. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing in a gallery, but it does get monotonous, so you’ll want to break things up with other arrangements as well.

A “single” featured in a D Emptyspace Gallery.

When singles work: Use singles for high impact images that need to be large to be fully appreciated, or images that tell a self-contained story.

The Diptych

From Greek and meaning “two fold” the diptych originated as an artwork in two parts. The earliest diptychs were actually painted on hinged wooden panels that allowed them to be folded, but, as with most things, they’ve evolved. Generally the two images in diptychs are the same size or very close to it.

Though their origins are ancient, diptychs are still used regularly in modern art. Take, for example, Andy Warhol’s famous Marilyn Diptych, a silk screen work from 1962.

A diptych featured in a D Emptyspace Gallery.

When diptychs work: Use diptychs to show the relationship (or juxtaposition) between two artworks, or to split one artwork across two panels.

The Triptych

I first came across the word triptych in a university art appreciation course. Like the diptych, the term comes from Greek and this time means “tri-fold.” It emerged in the early Christian church and in many cases the three images represented the trinity. While traditional triptychs had a near 2:1 aspect ratio, this is art, so there are no rules!

The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch, circa 1500. (Public Domain)

Perhaps the most famous and influential triptych is The Garden of Earthly Delights a very trippy piece by Hieronymus Bosch, pictured above.

A triptych featured in a D Emptyspace Gallery.

When triptychs work: Use triptychs to tell a story with clear sections, or to draw the eye across the wall. (Or as one article suggests, use triptychs to maximize wall coverage!)

D Emptyspace

D Emptyspace is available now for iPhone. It’s an app that allows you to create and explore inspiring virtual art galleries on your phone. More than just photo sharing, it’s a way to tell stories with your artwork.

Whether you want to curate an offline gallery and test the placement of your images first, send a specific arrangement to a curator, or create online galleries to share with your friends, D Emptyspace makes everything free and easy.

Download the app on iOS: https://apple.co/2MhsxCs

Android version coming soon!

Follow D Emptyspace for more company updates and art-curated content!

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Download